Oct
25
2019
0

Ivory Coast beats Serbia and Montenegro 3-2 in Group C

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Ivory Coast scored three goals to pull back a 2-0 deficit and beat Serbia and Montenegro in Munich, Wednesday.

This match had no effect on the Fifa World Cup round of sixteen as the two sides started the game without a point in Group C. The win was Ivory Coast’s first at a World Cup finals.

Serbia and Montenegro had been beaten 6-0 in their previous Group C tie with Argentina but to begin with seemed to have put that behind them.

Nikola Žigi? with great skill took down a long ball from Dejan Stankovic and rounded Boubacarthe Barry on 11 minutes. Ten minutes later Sasa Ili? made it two when Cyrille Domoraud under pressure miscontrolled the ball six yards from goal.

Moments of indiscipline – two Milan Dudic handballs and the sending off of Albert Nadj for a second yellow card just before half time – seemed to show it was the broken will of the Balkans team that eventually lost the game.

Ivory Coast would end the match with 68 per cent of ball possession and having had 14 extra shots, including a Blaise Kouassi effort that hit the white of Jevric’s goal.

Serbia and Montenegro were 2-0 up when on 37 minutes Dudic stuck out his hand to touch a ball tossed in front of Dragoslav Jevric’s goal. Aruna Dindane tucked the spot kick away. Moments later the side in blue were down to 10 men when Nadj walked for a rough challenge into the side of Abdulkader Keita.

In the second half Dindane bagged his second, a header from a Keita cross. Then Bonaventure Kalou stepped up and scored the winner from another penalty six minutes before time.

Milan Dudic had also a hand in the second Ivory Coast penalty as it was his hand that had got in the way of Kalou’s shot.

Both sides lacked the necessary discipline to keep 10 men on the pitch for the whole game. Domoraud received a second yellow in injury time and the captain had started to walk even before the referee had flashed his red.

Contents

  • 1 Statistics
    • 1.1 Ivory Coast
    • 1.2 Serbia and Montenegro
  • 2 Table
  • 3 Related news
  • 4 Sources
Written by in: Uncategorized |
Oct
25
2019
0

Bristol campaigners: words by council are ‘weasel words’

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Campaigners in Bristol, United Kingdom have said that the pledges of Bristol City Council regarding the plans to turn part of the Bristol and Bath cycle path into as bus route were just “weasel words.” This comes after the council refused to confirm that they would halt the development of the plan.

A petition was recently formed regarding the claims. One of the signatories of the petition, David Qualtrough, from Bedminster said when signing the petition that the suggestion was “quite honestly one of the most ludicrous ideas I’ve ever heard.” The text of the petition read “We, the undersigned, petition Bristol City Council to reject plans to install a rapid transit bus route along any section of the Bristol to Bath Railway Path “Greenway” and wildlife corridor. The Bristol to Bath Railway Path is the most popular route in the UK on the National Cycle Network with 2.4 million sustainable journeys in the last year.”

Bristol City Council‘s Executive Member for Access and Environment, Mark Bradshaw, commented on the issue in a video released late last month. He said that “no decisions have been made” regarding the use of the cycle path. He also said that Bristol City Council was “committed to a full public consultation”. Mr. Bradshaw also said that he would not engage in party political rows regarding these issues.

In an open letter written earlier this year, John Grimshaw, chair of Sustrans commented on the planned route. He said “The proposed route, the Bristol and Bath [cycle] Path, is one of the best used sections of the National Cycle Network. When Sustrans last surveyed this section of Network it was carrying 2.4 million trips a year. This usage is increasing at 10% a year. This amounts to over 6,500 trips each day, with 56% of these journeys being for work. 58% of users surveyed could have used a car for their journey but chose not to. A BRT route on this section will, we believe, reduce current levels of walking and cycling and may well actually encourage people to return to their cars.”

Some people did, however, support the plans. One of these people told the Bristol Evening Post that “The path is a public resource; its current use should not be artificially cast in stone forevermore; its application should be put to whatever use best serves the half million bristolians the council acts for and if that means turning this path into a bus route or railway or even road, this year or next; as part of relieving bristols overall transport problems then so be it. the council done right.”

Some of the people in opposition to the plans suggested that the train line accompanying the cycle path should be restored. They claimed that this would be a sensible alternative to having a bus on the cycle path.

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Oct
24
2019
0

Category:Featured article

Shortcut:WN:FA

Featured articles are selected by the community to represent the best of Wikinews. See the Featured Article Candidates page for nominations and discussions of candidate articles for this page. Or, subscribe to the RSS feed!

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Pages in category “Featured article”

Written by in: Uncategorized |
Oct
23
2019
0

Woman’s body found in home of Papua New Guinea leader

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

A woman has been found dead at the home of Sam Abal, the acting prime minister of Papua New Guinea. The body was discovered in the garden of the property early Monday morning. Abal’s adopted son, Teo, was arrested on Wednesday after a two-day search; he was reportedly the last person to be seen with the woman.

A murder investigation has been opened by Papua New Guinea police. Abal, currently living in a local hotel, released a statement, saying: “The alleged murder took place within the perimeters of my private home. All family members living with me are immediate suspects and are subject to investigation and questioning by police.”

Police Commissioner Anthony Wagambie commented on Teo Abal’s arrest, saying, “He was caught last night at the Pondorosa Hotel in Port Moresby and is currently being interviewed by police.”

Sam Abal has been the acting prime minister of Papua New Guinea since April of this year, when 75-year-old leader Michael Somare underwent heart surgery. Somare’s recovery has been extended but no date has been given as to his return.

Written by in: Uncategorized |
Oct
18
2019
0

National Museum of Scotland reopens after three-year redevelopment

Friday, July 29, 2011

Today sees the reopening of the National Museum of Scotland following a three-year renovation costing £47.4 million (US$ 77.3 million). Edinburgh’s Chambers Street was closed to traffic for the morning, with the 10am reopening by eleven-year-old Bryony Hare, who took her first steps in the museum, and won a competition organised by the local Evening News paper to be a VIP guest at the event. Prior to the opening, Wikinews toured the renovated museum, viewing the new galleries, and some of the 8,000 objects inside.

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Dressed in Victorian attire, Scottish broadcaster Grant Stott acted as master of ceremonies over festivities starting shortly after 9am. The packed street cheered an animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex created by Millenium FX; onlookers were entertained with a twenty-minute performance by the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers on the steps of the museum; then, following Bryony Hare knocking three times on the original doors to ask that the museum be opened, the ceremony was heralded with a specially composed fanfare – played on a replica of the museum’s 2,000-year-old carnyx Celtic war-horn. During the fanfare, two abseilers unfurled white pennons down either side of the original entrance.

The completion of the opening to the public was marked with Chinese firecrackers, and fireworks, being set off on the museum roof. As the public crowded into the museum, the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers resumed their performance; a street theatre group mingled with the large crowd, and the animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex entertained the thinning crowd of onlookers in the centre of the street.

On Wednesday, the museum welcomed the world’s press for an in depth preview of the new visitor experience. Wikinews was represented by Brian McNeil, who is also Wikimedia UK’s interim liaison with Museum Galleries Scotland.

The new pavement-level Entrance Hall saw journalists mingle with curators. The director, Gordon Rintoul, introduced presentations by Gareth Hoskins and Ralph Applebaum, respective heads of the Architects and Building Design Team; and, the designers responsible for the rejuvenation of the museum.

Describing himself as a “local lad”, Hoskins reminisced about his grandfather regularly bringing him to the museum, and pushing all the buttons on the numerous interactive exhibits throughout the museum. Describing the nearly 150-year-old museum as having become “a little tired”, and a place “only visited on a rainy day”, he commented that many international visitors to Edinburgh did not realise that the building was a public space; explaining the focus was to improve access to the museum – hence the opening of street-level access – and, to “transform the complex”, focus on “opening up the building”, and “creating a number of new spaces […] that would improve facilities and really make this an experience for 21st century museum visitors”.

Hoskins explained that a “rabbit warren” of storage spaces were cleared out to provide street-level access to the museum; the floor in this “crypt-like” space being lowered by 1.5 metres to achieve this goal. Then Hoskins handed over to Applebaum, who expressed his delight to be present at the reopening.

Applebaum commented that one of his first encounters with the museum was seeing “struggling young mothers with two kids in strollers making their way up the steps”, expressing his pleasure at this being made a thing of the past. Applebaum explained that the Victorian age saw the opening of museums for public access, with the National Museum’s earlier incarnation being the “College Museum” – a “first window into this museum’s collection”.

Have you any photos of the museum, or its exhibits?

The museum itself is physically connected to the University of Edinburgh’s old college via a bridge which allowed students to move between the two buildings.

Applebaum explained that the museum will, now redeveloped, be used as a social space, with gatherings held in the Grand Gallery, “turning the museum into a social convening space mixed with knowledge”. Continuing, he praised the collections, saying they are “cultural assets [… Scotland is] turning those into real cultural capital”, and the museum is, and museums in general are, providing a sense of “social pride”.

McNeil joined the yellow group on a guided tour round the museum with one of the staff. Climbing the stairs at the rear of the Entrance Hall, the foot of the Window on the World exhibit, the group gained a first chance to see the restored Grand Gallery. This space is flooded with light from the glass ceiling three floors above, supported by 40 cast-iron columns. As may disappoint some visitors, the fish ponds have been removed; these were not an original feature, but originally installed in the 1960s – supposedly to humidify the museum; and failing in this regard. But, several curators joked that they attracted attention as “the only thing that moved” in the museum.

The museum’s original architect was Captain Francis Fowke, also responsible for the design of London’s Royal Albert Hall; his design for the then-Industrial Museum apparently inspired by Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace.

The group moved from the Grand Gallery into the Discoveries Gallery to the south side of the museum. The old red staircase is gone, and the Millennium Clock stands to the right of a newly-installed escalator, giving easier access to the upper galleries than the original staircases at each end of the Grand Gallery. Two glass elevators have also been installed, flanking the opening into the Discoveries Gallery and, providing disabled access from top-to-bottom of the museum.

The National Museum of Scotland’s origins can be traced back to 1780 when the 11th Earl of Buchan, David Stuart Erskine, formed the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland; the Society being tasked with the collection and preservation of archaeological artefacts for Scotland. In 1858, control of this was passed to the government of the day and the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland came into being. Items in the collection at that time were housed at various locations around the city.

On Wednesday, October 28, 1861, during a royal visit to Edinburgh by Queen Victoria, Prince-Consort Albert laid the foundation-stone for what was then intended to be the Industrial Museum. Nearly five years later, it was the second son of Victoria and Albert, Prince Alfred, the then-Duke of Edinburgh, who opened the building which was then known as the Scottish Museum of Science and Art. A full-page feature, published in the following Monday’s issue of The Scotsman covered the history leading up to the opening of the museum, those who had championed its establishment, the building of the collection which it was to house, and Edinburgh University’s donation of their Natural History collection to augment the exhibits put on public display.

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Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Closed for a little over three years, today’s reopening of the museum is seen as the “centrepiece” of National Museums Scotland’s fifteen-year plan to dramatically improve accessibility and better present their collections. Sir Andrew Grossard, chair of the Board of Trustees, said: “The reopening of the National Museum of Scotland, on time and within budget is a tremendous achievement […] Our collections tell great stories about the world, how Scots saw that world, and the disproportionate impact they had upon it. The intellectual and collecting impact of the Scottish diaspora has been profound. It is an inspiring story which has captured the imagination of our many supporters who have helped us achieve our aspirations and to whom we are profoundly grateful.

The extensive work, carried out with a view to expand publicly accessible space and display more of the museums collections, carried a £47.4 million pricetag. This was jointly funded with £16 million from the Scottish Government, and £17.8 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Further funds towards the work came from private sources and totalled £13.6 million. Subsequent development, as part of the longer-term £70 million “Masterplan”, is expected to be completed by 2020 and see an additional eleven galleries opened.

The funding by the Scottish Government can be seen as a ‘canny‘ investment; a report commissioned by National Museums Scotland, and produced by consultancy firm Biggar Economics, suggest the work carried out could be worth £58.1 million per year, compared with an estimated value to the economy of £48.8 prior to the 2008 closure. Visitor figures are expected to rise by over 20%; use of function facilities are predicted to increase, alongside other increases in local hospitality-sector spending.

Proudly commenting on the Scottish Government’s involvement Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs, described the reopening as, “one of the nation’s cultural highlights of 2011” and says the rejuvenated museum is, “[a] must-see attraction for local and international visitors alike“. Continuing to extol the museum’s virtues, Hyslop states that it “promotes the best of Scotland and our contributions to the world.

So-far, the work carried out is estimated to have increased the public space within the museum complex by 50%. Street-level storage rooms, never before seen by the public, have been transformed into new exhibit space, and pavement-level access to the buildings provided which include a new set of visitor facilities. Architectural firm Gareth Hoskins have retained the original Grand Gallery – now the first floor of the museum – described as a “birdcage” structure and originally inspired by The Crystal Palace built in Hyde Park, London for the 1851 Great Exhibition.

The centrepiece in the Grand Gallery is the “Window on the World” exhibit, which stands around 20 metres tall and is currently one of the largest installations in any UK museum. This showcases numerous items from the museum’s collections, rising through four storeys in the centre of the museum. Alexander Hayward, the museums Keeper of Science and Technology, challenged attending journalists to imagine installing “teapots at thirty feet”.

The redeveloped museum includes the opening of sixteen brand new galleries. Housed within, are over 8,000 objects, only 20% of which have been previously seen.

  • Ground floor
  • First floor
  • Second floor
  • Top floor

The Window on the World rises through the four floors of the museum and contains over 800 objects. This includes a gyrocopter from the 1930s, the world’s largest scrimshaw – made from the jaws of a sperm whale which the University of Edinburgh requested for their collection, a number of Buddha figures, spearheads, antique tools, an old gramophone and record, a selection of old local signage, and a girder from the doomed Tay Bridge.

The arrangement of galleries around the Grand Gallery’s “birdcage” structure is organised into themes across multiple floors. The World Cultures Galleries allow visitors to explore the culture of the entire planet; Living Lands explains the ways in which our natural environment influences the way we live our lives, and the beliefs that grow out of the places we live – from the Arctic cold of North America to Australia’s deserts.

The adjacent Patterns of Life gallery shows objects ranging from the everyday, to the unusual from all over the world. The functions different objects serve at different periods in peoples’ lives are explored, and complement the contents of the Living Lands gallery.

Performance & Lives houses musical instruments from around the world, alongside masks and costumes; both rooted in long-established traditions and rituals, this displayed alongside contemporary items showing the interpretation of tradition by contemporary artists and instrument-creators.

The museum proudly bills the Facing the Sea gallery as the only one in the UK which is specifically based on the cultures of the South Pacific. It explores the rich diversity of the communities in the region, how the sea shapes the islanders’ lives – describing how their lives are shaped as much by the sea as the land.

Both the Facing the Sea and Performance & Lives galleries are on the second floor, next to the new exhibition shop and foyer which leads to one of the new exhibition galleries, expected to house the visiting Amazing Mummies exhibit in February, coming from Leiden in the Netherlands.

The Inspired by Nature, Artistic Legacies, and Traditions in Sculpture galleries take up most of the east side of the upper floor of the museum. The latter of these shows the sculptors from diverse cultures have, through history, explored the possibilities in expressing oneself using metal, wood, or stone. The Inspired by Nature gallery shows how many artists, including contemporary ones, draw their influence from the world around us – often commenting on our own human impact on that natural world.

Contrastingly, the Artistic Legacies gallery compares more traditional art and the work of modern artists. The displayed exhibits attempt to show how people, in creating specific art objects, attempt to illustrate the human spirit, the cultures they are familiar with, and the imaginative input of the objects’ creators.

The easternmost side of the museum, adjacent to Edinburgh University’s Old College, will bring back memories for many regular visitors to the museum; but, with an extensive array of new items. The museum’s dedicated taxidermy staff have produced a wide variety of fresh examples from the natural world.

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At ground level, the Animal World and Wildlife Panorama’s most imposing exhibit is probably the lifesize reproduction of a Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton. This rubs shoulders with other examples from around the world, including one of a pair of elephants. The on-display elephant could not be removed whilst renovation work was underway, and lurked in a corner of the gallery as work went on around it.

Above, in the Animal Senses gallery, are examples of how we experience the world through our senses, and contrasting examples of wildly differing senses, or extremes of such, present in the natural world. This gallery also has giant screens, suspended in the free space, which show footage ranging from the most tranquil and peaceful life in the sea to the tooth-and-claw bloody savagery of nature.

The Survival gallery gives visitors a look into the ever-ongoing nature of evolution; the causes of some species dying out while others thrive, and the ability of any species to adapt as a method of avoiding extinction.

Earth in Space puts our place in the universe in perspective. Housing Europe’s oldest surviving Astrolabe, dating from the eleventh century, this gallery gives an opportunity to see the technology invented to allow us to look into the big questions about what lies beyond Earth, and probe the origins of the universe and life.

In contrast, the Restless Earth gallery shows examples of the rocks and minerals formed through geological processes here on earth. The continual processes of the planet are explored alongside their impact on human life. An impressive collection of geological specimens are complemented with educational multimedia presentations.

Beyond working on new galleries, and the main redevelopment, the transformation team have revamped galleries that will be familiar to regular past visitors to the museum.

Formerly known as the Ivy Wu Gallery of East Asian Art, the Looking East gallery showcases National Museums Scotland’s extensive collection of Korean, Chinese, and Japanese material. The gallery’s creation was originally sponsored by Sir Gordon Wu, and named after his wife Ivy. It contains items from the last dynasty, the Manchu, and examples of traditional ceramic work. Japan is represented through artefacts from ordinary people’s lives, expositions on the role of the Samurai, and early trade with the West. Korean objects also show the country’s ceramic work, clothing, and traditional accessories used, and worn, by the indigenous people.

The Ancient Egypt gallery has always been a favourite of visitors to the museum. A great many of the exhibits in this space were returned to Scotland from late 19th century excavations; and, are arranged to take visitors through the rituals, and objects associated with, life, death, and the afterlife, as viewed from an Egyptian perspective.

The Art and Industry and European Styles galleries, respectively, show how designs are arrived at and turned into manufactured objects, and the evolution of European style – financed and sponsored by a wide range of artists and patrons. A large number of the objects on display, often purchased or commissioned, by Scots, are now on display for the first time ever.

Shaping our World encourages visitors to take a fresh look at technological objects developed over the last 200 years, many of which are so integrated into our lives that they are taken for granted. Radio, transportation, and modern medicines are covered, with a retrospective on the people who developed many of the items we rely on daily.

What was known as the Museum of Scotland, a modern addition to the classical Victorian-era museum, is now known as the Scottish Galleries following the renovation of the main building.

This dedicated newer wing to the now-integrated National Museum of Scotland covers the history of Scotland from a time before there were people living in the country. The geological timescale is covered in the Beginnings gallery, showing continents arranging themselves into what people today see as familiar outlines on modern-day maps.

Just next door, the history of the earliest occupants of Scotland are on display; hunters and gatherers from around 4,000 B.C give way to farmers in the Early People exhibits.

The Kingdom of the Scots follows Scotland becoming a recognisable nation, and a kingdom ruled over by the Stewart dynasty. Moving closer to modern-times, the Scotland Transformed gallery looks at the country’s history post-union in 1707.

Industry and Empire showcases Scotland’s significant place in the world as a source of heavy engineering work in the form of rail engineering and shipbuilding – key components in the building of the British Empire. Naturally, whisky was another globally-recognised export introduced to the world during empire-building.

Lastly, Scotland: A Changing Nation collects less-tangible items, including personal accounts, from the country’s journey through the 20th century; the social history of Scots, and progress towards being a multicultural nation, is explored through heavy use of multimedia exhibits.

Written by in: Uncategorized |
Oct
18
2019
0

Cambodian lawmaker calls for ASEAN website to be blocked over missing land

Saturday, June 2, 2007

Thirty-five square kilometers, or 13.5135755 square miles, or 3,500 hectares or 8,648.68835 acres.

However you figure it, it’s a sizeable chunk of land.

And it’s missing from Cambodia on the website for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN, a 10-member regional body of which Cambodia is a member.

The apparent rounding down of Cambodia’s territory, 181,035 square kilometers, on the ASEAN website, has some Cambodian lawmakers up in arms.

Parliamentarian Keo Remy, a member of the opposition Sam Rainsy Party, is calling for the ASEAN website to be blocked by Cambodia’s Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications if the number is not corrected.

“We know that Cambodia has border disputes with its neighbors, and Khmer citizens are paying attention on these issues. We cannot accept such incorrect points. The most important thing is that the government should close this web site,” Keo was quoted as saying by the Khmer-language daily newspaper Kampuchea Thmey.

Though Keo acknowledged the error could be an honest, if careless, mistake, he said it could mean something more sinister – that ASEAN is trying to undermine Cambodia’s sovereignty, and that perhaps ASEAN is working for neighboring nations. It could even be treasonous, he said.

“If it was intentional and perpetrated by a Cambodian, this is treason. It is like not knowing your own parents,” Keo was quoted as saying by Deutsche Presse-Agentur.

Other lawmakers also called on the Cambodian government to take action.

“The royal government must react urgently, especially the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation,” Monh Saphan, a Funcinpec parliamentarian was quoted as saying by Kampuchea Thmey. “The website [must] be corrected, because it affects the territorial integrity of the Kingdom of Cambodia.”

And non-governmental organization leaders weighed in.

“The state’s figure is more important and appropriate than figures of other organizations. Therefore, we should urge the government to check this issue,” Seng Theary, executive director of the Center for Social Development, told Kampucha Thmey. “We also wonder where ASEAN got this figure.”

Kek Galabru, president of the Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights, said that incorrect figure is most likely a mistake, but said the government should investigate it. “Otherwise a small problem might turn into a bigger issue,” she said.

Government spokesman and Information Minister Khieu Kanharith said he would investigate, and called for cooler heads in the meantime.

Border disputes are a hot-button political issue in Cambodia, which has some long-standing unresolved boundary conflicts with neighbors Thailand and Vietnam.

Cambodia joined ASEAN in 1999, the last country to gain admittance to the regional geo-political and economic body for Southeast Asia. It was founded in 1967 by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Other members are Brunei, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam.

Written by in: Uncategorized |
Oct
18
2019
0

International experts probe deadly Ebola Reston virus outbreak in Philippine pigs

Thursday, January 8, 2009

Global animal and health authorities’ emergency mission to the Philippines is investigating whether the strain of deadly Ebola Reston virus, recently discovered in dead pigs, poses a threat to human health. Unlike more-deadly strains of Ebola virus, Philippine health officials say this particular strain, known as the Reston ebolavirus, has never caused human illness or death, and it’s not immediately clear there is a public-health issue.

A 22-member team of experts from three United Nations agencies arrived in Manila on Tuesday for a joint risk assessment on the virus contamination of local swine, to help the government contain the outbreak. The mission will coordinate with the Philippine counterparts – the Departments of Agriculture and Health. According to chief veterinary officer, Davinio P. Catbagan, six of 28 swine samples tested positive for Ebola-Reston by the U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratory. The infected pigs came from two commercial and two backyard farms in three provinces north of Manila. Both Ebola and related Marburg hemorrhagic fever, are considered to infect humans via primates.

The Straits Times reported that as of December, about 6,000 pigs at Pandi, Bulacan and Talavera farms had tested positive for the Ebola-Reston virus. “Eating pork remained safe as long as it is handled and cooked properly (at a minimum of 70 degrees Celsius or 158 degrees Fahrenheit) and bought in outlets accredited by the government’s National Meat Inspection Service,” said a joint statement by the World Health Organisation (WHO), World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). “Our teams are doing field and laboratory investigation to determine where the Ebola-Reston virus came from and how it was transmitted,” Caroline-Anne Coulombe, WHO risk communications officer, explained.

According to FAO team leader, Juan Lubroth, it was the first time that the Ebola-Reston virus strain had infected animals other than monkeys and the first recorded worldwide in swine. The U.N. mission is scheduled to perform 10 days scientific tests, on two hog farms in Manaoag, Pangasinan and Pandi, Bulacan, but it would take months to publish evaluation reports on the virus.

As early as May, a high incidence of swine sickness and death in three provinces caused Philippine authorities in August to send samples from the dead pigs to the NY Plum Island Animal Disease Center. The results found the presence of several diseases, including Ebola Reston virus and PRRS.

In late October laboratory tests confirmed that pigs in Nueva Ecija and Bulacan farms were infected with the Ebola-Reston virus and the highly virulent strain of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRS). In early 2007 pigs on those farms died at a faster rate than usual amid the conducted lab tests. PRRSV, or Blue-Ear Pig Disease (zh? lán?r bìng ????), is a viral and economically important pandemic disease which causes reproductive failure in breeding stock and respiratory tract illness in young pigs. Initially referred to as ‘mystery swine disease’ or ‘mystery reproductive syndrome’, it was first reported in 1987 in North America and Central Europe. The disease costs the United States swine industry around $600 million annually.

In December, the Philippine health authorities conducted testing of about 10,000 swine in two northern Luzon quarantined farms. Reuters reported that “the Ebola-Reston virus in some pigs in two commercial farms and two backyard farms in the Philippines were discovered by accident in United States laboratory tests in September, when samples were sent to test another disease.”

Ebola virus is one of at least 18 known viruses capable of causing the viral hemorrhagic fever syndrome. It is the common term for a group of viruses belonging to genus Ebolavirus, family Filoviridae, and for the disease which they cause, Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The virus is named after the Ebola River where the first recognized outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred in 1976. The viruses are characterized by long filaments and have a similar shape to the Marburg virus, also in the family Filoviridae, and share similar disease symptoms. Since its discovery, Ebolavirus has been responsible for a number of deaths.

In the central Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the highly contagious Ebola virus was first detected in September, according to Medecins Sans Frontieres. “As of Tuesday January 7, a total of 42 patients have been reported with suspected Ebola haemorrhagic fever in the province of Western Kasai… 13 of these 42 patients suspected of having Ebola have died,” it said.

The Reston ebolavirus is suspected of being either another subtype of the Ebola or a new filovirus of Asian origin. It was first discovered in crab-eating macaques originating in the Philippines, from Hazleton Laboratories (now Covance) in 1989. This discovery attracted significant media attention and led to the publication of The Hot Zone. There was then, an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever among monkeys imported from the Philippines to Reston, Virginia. The Ebola-Reston strain was discovered among Philippine monkeys in the U.S. again in 1990 and 1996, and in Italy in 1992.

According to the World Health Organization, African strains kill 50 percent to 90 percent of those infected through lethal bleeding and organ failure. “Since the 1970s, scientists, veterinarians, microbiologists and physicians have been looking at thousands of species to see if they can find this elusive reservoir, and we have been pretty much empty-handed,” Juan Lubroth, head of infectious diseases in the animal health unit of the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome, explained.

Despite its status as a Level-4 organism, the Reston ebolavirus is non-pathogenic to humans and is only mildly fatal to monkeys; the perception of its lethality was skewed due to the monkey’s coinfection with Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). During the incident in which it was discovered, six animal handlers eventually became seroconverted, one of whom had cut himself while performing a necropsy on the liver of an infected monkey. When the handler failed to become ill, it was concluded that the virus had a very low pathogenicity to humans.

In January 1997, The Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources had ordered the immediate slaughter of some 600 monkeys in Ferlite, a breeding farm in Laguna, to prevent an outbreak of the deadly Ebola Reston strain virus.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had donated 8,000 test kits to diagnose the ebola reston strain. “I am more concerned in the international community because we have proven in our December sales that this ebola did not affect consumer confidence,” Albert R. T. Lim, president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., warned. The Philippines Department of Agriculture (DA) has directed the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) and the National Meat Inspection Commission (NMIC) to conduct swine tests in South Cotabato using the US test kits for the Ebola Reston virus, before approval of the “Meat in a Box” shipment to Singapore. The initial export of the meat for December was deferred pending outcome of the ERV tests.

Meanwhile, in eight Barangays of Santa Maria, Davao del Sur, in Mindanao, at least 50 pigs died since December due to viral and bacterial infections. Dr. Nestor Barroga, provincial veterinarian, said that he could not however detect yet the type of the infecting virus. The village of Pong-pong had the largest number of casualties. Mercy Olalo, a hog raiser, said their pigs would suddenly become weak and eventually die. “The pigs developed red skins and they salivate excessively,” she said.

Written by in: Uncategorized |
Sep
18
2019
0

Charles Lazarus, founder of US-based toy retail giant Toys ‘R’ Us, dies at 94

Saturday, March 24, 2018

On Thursday, Charles Lazarus, the founder of United States toy retailer Toys “R” Us, died in Manhattan, New York, New York of respiratory failure. He was 94. His death came a week after Toys “R” Us announced that all of the stores were closing.

Toys “R” Us issued a statement in which they said, “There have been many sad moments for Toys “R” Us in recent weeks, and none more heartbreaking than today’s news about the passing of our beloved founder, Charles Lazarus. He visited us in New Jersey just last year and we will forever be grateful for his positive energy, passion for the customer and love for children everywhere. Our thoughts and prayers are with Charles’ family and loved ones.”

Michael Goldstein, who was a close friend and former Toys “R” Us chairman, said: “He was the father of the toy business. He knew the toys and loved the toys and loved the kids who would shop in the stores. His face lit up when he watched kids playing with toys.” In a phone interview Goldstein said that Charles Lazarus died in Manhattan.

Lazarus no longer held a stake in the chain, CNN reported. Lazarus took over his father’s bicycle repair shop in 1948 at the age of 25 and changed it to baby furniture. He opened the first Toys “R” Us store in 1957. Lazarus had remained its CEO until 1994.

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Sep
18
2019
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Authorities search for victims of Peruvian air crash

Thursday, August 25, 2005

Rescuers are searching for the victims of the Tans Peru airliner crash which occurred earlier this month. Emergency services rescued 5 survivors on Thursday morning.

TANS say that 41 people were killed and a further 57 injured in this, the fifth airliner crash worldwide this month. The Boeing 737-200 airliner crash-landed in heavy jungle near the city of Pucallpa, 840 kilometers (522 miles) northeast of Lima, the capital city.

Peruvian authorities have ordered an investigation and have shipped the aircraft’s two flight data recorders, or “black boxes” to the United States for data retrieval.

Jorge Belevan said “We’ve also found five more survivors and that takes the number (of survivors) to 57. Two people are still missing and there are 41 dead,” Local authorities also said that the death toll is likely to rise due to inaccessible location of the crash site. This is the second TANS Peru plane crash in three years, following the January 2003 crash of flight 222 in the Peruvian rainforest. In that plane crash there were no survivors.

Peruvian government lawyer Marco Ochoa said that rescuers are opening the skin of the aircraft to determine whether there are more bodies trapped inside.

Survivors said that the plane was caught in a fierce storm about 10 minutes before the crash. The plane then caught fire and landed in swampland.

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Sep
18
2019
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News briefs:April 23, 2010

 Correction — August 24, 2015 These briefs incorrectly describe BP as ‘British Petroleum’. In fact, such a company has not existed for many years as BP dropped this name when becoming a multinational company. The initials no longer stand for anything. 
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